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The Most Effective Forms of Project Management Training

31 Jul 2012
The Most Effective Forms of Project Management Training

As we approach the autumn, many professionals will once again consider upskilling and enhancing their credential’s profile over the coming seasons.

Education and ongoing training are essential for project managers, and there are different training delivery options available in the marketplace. Here are some summary results of a recent survey conducted by Project Management Solutions, a USA based company.

According to the 262 business executives and managers, PMO directors, and project and program managers who participated in the survey, not all forms of project management training are created equal- or are even effective. Instead, they measure the effectiveness of project management training based on evaluations that training participants fill out, positive changes in how project resources do their jobs, assessments of knowledge gained and based on business results that can be clearly linked to the training.

Rankings

  1. Instructor-led Classroom Training
    Survey participants ranked instructor-led classroom training the most effective method for various reasons, including the opportunity to network, spontaneously ask questions and share experiences, and learn in an environment that tries to mimic actual project team dynamics.

    The instructors are typically seasoned project managers who have a lot of war stories. They felt hearing lessons from someone who has the scars is invaluable. There are also a lot of breakout groups and exercises. Students work with each other to resolve problems and handle conflicts.
  2. Blended Techniques
    Blended techniques, which combine instructor led-classroom learning with some combination of self-directed e-learning, instructor-led e-learning (such as webinars), or technology-delivered training (such as CD-ROMs or podcasts), ranked second.
  3. Technology Driven
    Technology-delivered training did not fare so well, even among IT professionals. Less than one-third (29 per cent) of respondents deemed self-directed e-learning to be worthwhile. Fewer (27 per cent) considered instructor-led e-learning to be valuable. One in five (20 per cent) think technology-delivered training is useful.

The Institute has several training forms, which you can explore more by clicking here.